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Alex Hardwicke

I'm the author of this blog. I'm a dad, husband and programmer, in roughly that order. Read more about me here.

Links

John Sonmez’s Blogging Email Course

If you look at the date difference between this post and my last few, you’ll see that I haven’t really blogged in months. This is a real shame, as I’d put a lot of effort into starting the blog and getting a routine going, but I ran out ideas and wasn’t sure what direction I […]

Link: Bing Developer Assistant

For a while now, I’ve been using Bing Code Search in Visual Studio, and recently Microsoft did a rather substantial update where they combined the extension with the Visual Studio Sample Browser and created the Bing Developer Assistant. It has three core components: It extends IntelliSense, giving you suggestions on how to use the code […]

Link: Exception.StackTraceEx

So, not long after I finally blog about Little Watson, Lucian Wischik releases a tool that could really help with it! He’s created a fantastic tool called Exception.StackTraceEx. He explains it better than I could, but essentially it provides a way to have exceptions in async calls provide much more information, including filenames and line […]

Link: Mr Flakey

That genius Lucian Wischik at Microsoft has written a nice tool called Mr Flakey which you can use to fiddle with async calls. He describes the use in detail in the link, but essentially Mr Flakey lets you simulate async calls failing (e.g. network errors) and test how your code responds to these errors. It […]

Link: Raygun Error and Crash Reporting

I stumbled upon Raygun, an automated error and crash reporter. It looks very interesting: reasonable pricing (even affordable for some hobbyists), used by a lot of great companies, and supports every platform you can think of (yes, including all Microsoft platforms). I currently use my own Little Watson implementation, but it relies on user interaction. […]

Link: Visual Studio Image Library

I recently discovered the Visual Studio Image Library. Microsoft has made over 1,000 icons used in Office, Windows, Visual Studio and other software available so that your desktop software can have a consistent look with modern Microsoft applications. I can definitely see myself using some of these in the future, and using some as base […]

Alex Hardwicke

A programming blog, focused on Xamarin & F#.